Download disabled

The designer of this FontStruction has chosen not to make it available for download from this website by choosing an “All Rights Reserved" license.

Please respect their decision and desist from requesting license changes in the comments.

If you would like to use the FontStruction for a specific project, you may be able to contact the designer directly about obtaining a license.

I began this fontstruction as a challenge to create a seriffed pixel font with grid characteristics similar to iSlab’s 8 pt setting (bearing an x-height of four pixels). This inspiration began with similar shapes and roots as its predecessor, but evolved from there once it quickly became clear that those shapes really could not be reproduced with strict pixels. Then I went on a bender creating the katakana and hiragana character set. Then I went crazy with filters and single brick substitution.
Info: Created on 14th February 2010 . Last edited on 16th March 2010.
License Creative Commons
Categories:
Sets:
Tags:
Fave Tags:
  • -

14 Comments

I am getting into the habit of sharing these in-progress, mostly finished, but not-quite-there-yet fontstructions. Consequently I appreciate creative input, and ask your forbearance as I bring this too past beta.

Meanwhile, I am fascinated by how these extreme fidelity constraints yield some intriguing display possibilities for this serif font. I think letters like the g and æ exhibit some great modular and pattern-like constructions. Even how the serifs run into each other here and create solid lines contrasts in a compelling way the “disappearing” serifs of iSlab set small, and evokes beauty. It whispers for some tastefully stroked or decorated treatment, ala AnTyp.

More to come :).
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 16th February 2010
This image was made in photoshop a good while before the advent of composite bricks. Composites, it turns out, made this variation a simple brick substitution away.
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 16th February 2010
Oh snap, I didn’t fully think through that stroking/display concept. A quick rendition in photoshop yielded the above sample. Now that’s fontstructable.

It’s been done well and long before me, but I know what I want to try out later on! : )
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 16th February 2010
Ici-pici slab serif wonder, amazingly legible and fully functional. Have you seen the legendary Susan Kare's 7 pixel (ascender-to-descender) fonts? 10/10
Comment by Frodo7 16th February 2010
@Frodo7: Thank you for the great reference. I guess this really dates my interest in typography :).

Even as an adult I wasn’t cognizant of Susan Kare’s work until you pointed me back to it. However, having grown up with the Macintosh platform, I certainly was steeped in some of her work as a young computer user. Doubtlessly, it influenced my certain likes and dislikes of bitmap fonts that went on to inform decisions I made about this very pixel structure.

She was compelled by the same solutions for i and j which match my ascender height one pixel taller than the cap height (8 total pixels tall, by your assessment). The effective pixel profile for the basic latin set is quite similar, then, though her font is ultimately more vertically compact.

I like to see where I gave myself the rare liberty to create wider characters vs. her choices. Her inventive x trumps my g, I think. Overall, I think she succeeded in generating greater legibility. I won on space efficiency. I decided early on to go with a different genre of serif type, though my results ended up so similarly slabby to hers

I am pretty happy to see where the creative constraints lead me. I take it that minimums lead to different ways in each and every case.
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 17th February 2010
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 3rd March 2010
すばらしですね! ^_^
Comment by thalamic 3rd March 2010
The Katakana set is a welcome addition to this font. Not an easy feat at this small size.

@thalamic: I agree, it is great! It took me half an hour to translate your short remark. But why did you write it with Hiragana?
Comment by Frodo7 3rd March 2010
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 6th March 2010
@frodo: Because I'm very weak in kanji.

@will: どう いたしまして。
Comment by thalamic 6th March 2010
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 16th March 2010
the font in your sample seems different, is it also on Fontstruct ?
Comment by Abneurone Fluid Types 16th March 2010
Thank you all for your continued interest in this little chip off the ol’ slab. :-)

I will be away from the my computer for the rest of the week – just wanted to quickly thank you all for the kind words of support (including all who have commented on the other permutations I am experimenting with).

Have a beautiful week!
Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) 16th March 2010
Congratulations! FontStruct Staff have deemed your FontStruction worthy of special mention. “iChip” is now a Top Pick.
Comment by afrojet 17th March 2010

Also of Interest

More from the Gallery

fs Permutation IXby William Leverette (will.i.ૐ)
fs Fermatby William Leverette (will.i.ૐ)
fs galacticaby William Leverette (will.i.ૐ)
Djangogh 2xby William Leverette (will.i.ૐ)
db Luckyby beate
fs lostby ETHproductions
Luthien Pixelby Frodo7
Myrtille Pixelby Frodo7

From the Blog

News

Competition: Counter

News

Our Palace – 10 FontStructive Years

News

Google Fonts sponsors FontStruct in 2018

News

Happy Holidays 2017