Insular Typewriter

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by Christian Munk (CMunk)

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I thought the round celtic/gaelic/insular forms of the latin letters would lend themselves well to a typewriter-esque font. Only later did I google it to find that Michael Everson is the king of this area. Now I should really get back to my exam paper.
Info: Created on 31st May 2014 . Last edited on 12th April 2018.
License Open Font License
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23 Comments

Interesting concept - I'd love to have seen the typewriter used ... probably made of bronze :)

Good luck with the exams.
Comment by p2pnut 1st June 2014
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 1st June 2014
This is awesome. :)
Comment by TCWhite 1st June 2014
P.S. My only suggestion would be to maybe move the bar of the f up a little.
Comment by TCWhite 1st June 2014
Thanks TCWhite! I moved the bar of the f up one brick, and that's exactly what it needed :)
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 2nd June 2014
Congratulations! FontStruct Staff have deemed your FontStruction worthy of special mention. “Insular Typewriter” is now a Top Pick.
Comment by Rob Meek (meek) 3rd June 2014
Great font, but it's missing a 4.
Comment by jimhv 3rd June 2014
I know, but 4's are hard :p
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 4th June 2014
A few 'rough and ready' suggestions ...
Comment by p2pnut 4th June 2014
Hope your paper turned out as well as this celtic revival.
Comment by four 4th June 2014
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 6th June 2014
Thanks a bunch for the top pick, meek! :D

I made the 4. Thank you for the suggestions p2pnut :)

Thank you, four!

Should I make the w more like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breton_language#mediaviewer/File:Bilingual_sign_Vannes_Gwened.jpg
I will make an alternate g on the "latin letter script small g" in IPA extensions (U+0261).
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 6th June 2014
I have put the alternate w on the "latin letter small turned m"-codepoint in the IPA (ɯ) or U+026F.
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 6th June 2014
Pretty! The @ is wonderful.
Comment by V. Sarela (Yautja) 6th June 2014
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 6th June 2014
Nice. I see you added the horned O, but if you hadn't gotten around to it yet, or didn't know, you forgot to add the horned U. I like that you added the Tironian et. Plus, not that it's a huge issue depending on your design, but the characters listed as G, K, L, N, R, S, & T, with cedilla, are actually supposed to be commas—it's a unicode naming mistake. But, if your cedilla is the same shape, it works. :) I like your sz ligature. And, what's the character next to the horned O? If it's (listed as Oi, which is wrong, as its actually Gha) that character is no longer used—just mentioning this is all.
Comment by TCWhite 7th June 2014
Thank you TCWhite.

The horned o, I added because I was making the d with caron, which turned out very similar, so I could easily make it.

I might change the cedilla/comma thing. But s and t do exist with a cedilla as well as a comma, right? The others just share a unicode point.

The character next to the horned o is the alternate g i was talking about. It's in the IPA section.
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 8th June 2014
I can't begin to comment on the historical significance/compliance of this as being completely ignorant of it. All I can say is that the glyphs are a visually very pleasing to the eye.
Comment by thalamic 8th June 2014
The horned o, if you were unaware, is part of the Vietnamese character set, as is u. If you want to add the rest, they're in the Latin extended additional block.

Yes, s and t both have code points for comma and cedilla. The comma characters are in extended B. And yes, g, k, l, n, and r, are both cedilla/comma. In the languages that use them, the comma is preferred.

And, ah, now that I look at the extra g again, I recognized it as such, lol.
Comment by TCWhite 8th June 2014
Comment by Christian Munk (CMunk) 3rd April 2015

Can't belive I haven't seen this before. Brilliant!

Comment by Icelar 12th December 2015

Awesome! 10/10

Comment by Atlantis L. (Jack Lee Jie) 14th December 2015

This class

Comment by gugus651 31st March 2016

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