Folletto Fino

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by blu.
Cloned from Folletto Grasso by blu.. See also Folletto Fino Legato by blu..

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light version of "folletto grasso"...

Info: Created on Sun, 14th April . Last edited on Wed, 24th April.
License Creative Commons
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6 Comments

I dig it – and looks like you got a handle on the expert features that made it quick to create this!

Are you aware of how to use the green right sidebearing guide that sets letter width? As long as guides are unlocked (Advanced menu) you can set this in 1/8 grid increments. The left sidebearing is fixed to the origin, so nudging characters adjusts the lsb relatively speaking.

Sequential characters with two adjacent vertical strokes (and/or trailing tails or serifs) have noticeably different optical letterspacing compared to two adjacent round letterforms – even if the absolute minimum distance between characters is the same. The space between characters breaths differently as the overall whitespace between (and within) them is different.

Compare ab to bc. While it’s not a replacement for manual kerning (which fontstruct also has!), looser sidebearings around vertical strokes can helpfully account for this phenomenon in a general way.

I’m noticing that characters with vertical strokes have much tighter optical setting here. You may find a middle ground one nudge space looser to that left and right of vertical strokes that not only resolves your issue with b colliding with other glyphs, but improves the letterspacing generally. I think these very round and airy extra light characters will benefit from looser global letterspacing because they contain so much whitespace to begin with. As well, all these fun curvy tailing bits seem a bit noodly too close together. They will feel more elegant and a touch playful just beginning to invite each other’s proximity without getting too close to tangle. More of a cheeky “come hither” than an “about to caress.”

If my detailed explanation feels remedial or covers ground you already grasp, excuse my enthusiasm to see the best result from your work. The kerning page says it really simply:

“* Do as much to achieve the spacing you want using the other spacing controls at your disposal before resorting to kerning. Many spacing issues can be solved simply by adjusting letter width and the global letter spacing.”

Comment by William Leverette (will.i.ૐ) Tue, 16th April

will.i.ૐ: thank you :) yes, it's much more fun to make fonts with the composite and stacking mode. yes, i'm aware of the letter width. i will look what i can do to make the letters a bit looser. thanks for the explanation.

Comment by blu. Thu, 18th April

Lovely just like the parent font but lighter, it has a summery feel to it. A fine line font, smooth and comfortingly rounded. Instant 10/10

Comment by Aeolien Sun, 21st April

@Aeolien: thank you :)

Comment by blu. Mon, 22nd April

This is very cool indeed, it does feel slightly like a contemporary stripped down take on a medieval Gaelic style script. I would love to see some stilistic variation to this, maybe one that has support for uppercase or one with some creative character alternatives as a adition to these two. Well done so far.

And as William mentioned about the individual spacing in combination with round letterforms is very important in a case like this with a light stroke weight font.

In simple words this basically means that two adjacent round shapes will open up as they curve away from eachother, creating more white space, so these require a slight adjustment to get them closer together in order to achieve optical balance. Whereas vertical strokes tend to feel tighter together. What I usually do is keeping the space that is inbetween vertical strokes as my baseline for further kerning/metrics. Because once you start adjusting these verticals you end up in a complete mess and do more harm than good. So best is to leave these untouched whenever possible.

But this comment by William is basically gold, this stuff makes or breaks the final result of your work, period! Very well explained too, so for everyone new into typedesign and is reading this, learn from what was written in the first comment. Since this kind of good educational info can be tricky to find.

;)

Anyway looking forward to your next creation blu, keep it going

Cheers

Comment by Sed4tives Mon, 22nd April

@Sed4tives: thank you for the kind words. :) i will try to make some variations.

as for will.i.ૐ's comment, i'm a bit clueless. i understand roughly what is meant, but i don't understand how it is solved (too many specific words that i don't understand...). what i have done so far, is that i added space to the letters that touched with "b". but for the rest, i don't know...

Comment by blu. Wed, 24th April

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